Last edited by Fenrikree
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Utility of competing risks in analyzing outcomes of repair of congenital heart defects. found in the catalog.

Utility of competing risks in analyzing outcomes of repair of congenital heart defects.

David A. Ashburn

Utility of competing risks in analyzing outcomes of repair of congenital heart defects.

by David A. Ashburn

  • 291 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

Background and objectives. Congenital heart disease outcomes analysis often involves competing endpoints. Generation of clinically relevant competing risks (CR) models providing therapeutic inferences is demonstrated.Conclusions. CR is useful in analyzing outcomes after congenital heart surgery. Clinically relevant multivariable models demonstrating the impact of important risk factors on outcomes can be generated.For ACHD, CR defined prevalence of hospital mortality (4.5%) and discharge (95.5%). Single CR model simultaneously analyzed mortality and LOS and illustrated risk factor impact on early outcomes.Results. In PAIVS, CR prevalence of 15-year end-states were: 2-ventricle repair, 33%; Fontan, 20%; pre-repair death, 38%; other, 9%. Morphologically-driven institutional protocols mitigate impact of unfavorable morphology.Methods. CR methodology was used to quantify cumulative incidence and risk factors for: (1) death and definitive repair states in 408 neonates with pulmonary atresia-intact ventricular septum (PAIVS); (2) hospital mortality and discharge in 1351 adult congenital cardiac operations (ACHD).

The Physical Object
Pagination101 leaves.
Number of Pages101
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20239056M
ISBN 100494025298

Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most common type of birth defect in the United States. They are the leading cause of infant death due to birth defects. Approximately 9 out of every 1, infants are born with CHD, and 25% of these defects are considered to be critical congenital heart defects (CCHD).   Congenital heart defects usually are treated by a pediatric cardiologist and possibly a cardiac surgeon. Treatment for congenital heart defects, whether they are detected at birth or later in life, may involve medication, surgery, or a combination of both. Medications to Treat Congenital Heart Defects. A number of medicines may be used to treat.

Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defects, affecting approximately 1 in live births in the United States. Although there have been many advances in . Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, occurring in almost 1% of live births (1). Among birth defects, congenital heart disease is the leading cause of infant mortality. Environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of congenital heart .

Learning Objectives/Outcomes. After completing this continuing education activity you will be able to: identify the appropriate procedures for repair of the four congenital heart defects described. recognize nursing care considerations for patients who have undergone repair of a .   Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect, affecting roughly 1% of all births in the United States. Thanks to advancements in treatments, it’s estimated that 1 million adults are now living with a congenital heart defect.


Share this book
You might also like
KGB calling Eve

KGB calling Eve

Federal Employees Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules Act of 1982

Federal Employees Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules Act of 1982

Computer data entry market study.

Computer data entry market study.

TEACHING WITH AUTHORITY : CHAPTERS 8 &9

TEACHING WITH AUTHORITY : CHAPTERS 8 &9

List of journal titles taken by the library.

List of journal titles taken by the library.

The Henderson illustrated anthology of money

The Henderson illustrated anthology of money

Soil survey: Howard County, Texas

Soil survey: Howard County, Texas

Bibliography of mathematics published in Communist China during the period 1949-1960

Bibliography of mathematics published in Communist China during the period 1949-1960

War prayers for a week on litergical lines ...

War prayers for a week on litergical lines ...

Dossier on Douglas

Dossier on Douglas

Ramaṇa Maharshi and his philosophy of existence

Ramaṇa Maharshi and his philosophy of existence

Latitudes and longitudes of certain points in Missouri, Kansas, and New Mexico

Latitudes and longitudes of certain points in Missouri, Kansas, and New Mexico

Joining hands for quality tourism

Joining hands for quality tourism

Utility of competing risks in analyzing outcomes of repair of congenital heart defects by David A. Ashburn Download PDF EPUB FB2

Utility of Competing Risks in Analyzing Outcomes of Repair of Congenital Heart Defects David A. Ashburn M.D. John W. Kirklin Research Fellow Congenital Heart Surgeons Society Data Center Division of Cardiovascular Surgery Hospital for Sick Children Toronto, Ontario A thesis submitted in conformity with the requirements.

“Congenital Heart Defects, Simplified is destined to become the reference book for neonatal and pediatric units.

The major defects are covered completely and succinctly in bullet format. The color illustrations help enormously in the understanding of each heart or vascular defect.

In a study published in the Journal of Pediatrics, CDC researchers examined the impact of congenital heart disease (CHD) on a child’s daily life, other illnesses or conditions, and healthcare use.

Researchers found that children with CHD are more likely to report worse health overall, to need more healthcare services, and to have other health conditions (e.g., autism, intellectual. OVERVIEW: Many congenital heart defects can be repaired, but long-term monitoring is often required to forestall possible complications.

This two-part article reviews 10 common congenital heart defects, their repairs, and their common long-term outcomes, along with the implications for nurses in cardiac and noncardiac settings alike.

4/18/NursePub/UCSF & Mt Zion Nursing Services/Unit Documents/6picu/cardiac defects 8 Truncus Arteriosus Anatomy Truncus arteriosus is a rare congenital heart defect in which a single great vessel arises from the heart, giving rise to the coronary, systemic and pulmonary arteries.

This single vessel contains only one valve (truncal. An atrial or ventricular septal defect repair closes a hole in the heart’s septum.

A septum, or wall, separates the two top chambers, or atria, and the two bottom chambers, or ventricles. Your doctor will sew the hole closed or patch the hole with your own tissue or a synthetic patch.

OVERVIEW: Many congenital heart defects can be repaired, but long-term monitoring is often required to forestall possible complications. This two-part article reviews 10 common congenital heart defects, their re - pairs, and their common long-term outcomes, along with the implications for nurses in cardiac and noncar - diac settings alike.

The congenital heart defects are presented with each chapter devoted to a single malformation, with incidence, morphology, associated anomalies, pathophysiology, diagnosis (including clinical pattern, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, echocardiogram, cardiac catheterization with angiography), indications for surgical treatment, details of Price: $ Volume and Outcomes (N = 53) Congenital Heart Disease Congenital heart disease affects an estimated 1 million people in America.

Each year, approximately 1 in every babies born in the United States has a congenital heart defect. In some cases, the disease is life-threatening at birth. However, many people with a congenital heart. Congenital Heart Defects Congenital heart defects are a leading cause of death in infancy.

Congenital heart defects may take many forms and represent a wide range of risk. Some simple defects, such as a small opening between heart chambers, may be consistent with good health and a normal life span.

Other defects, such as an. INTRODUCTION. Congenital heart defects are the most frequently occurring birth anomaly, affecting around 8 in every 1, live births. 1 This corresponds to million live births with congenital heart disease (CHD) worldwide annually, 2 representing a significant global health burden.

With advances in cardiac surgery and perioperative and medical care, over 85% of. Heart defects occur in 8/ live births; 90% of congenital heart defects have no known cause; isolated heart defects have multifactorial inheritance meaning they are caused by a combination of genes and environment; Recurrence Risks.

The general population risk is ~1%; For parents with one affected child the recurrence risk is between %. Students with congenital heart defects are required daily to handle the physical problems and limitations as well as the emotional, intelligential and behavioural issues associated with CHD.

"As a group, children with CHD have a higher likelihood of academic, behavioural and coordination problems compared to children without CHD." (Wernovsky, ).

Expressly created to assist with decision making for surgical treatment of congenital heart defects, this new reference covers all relevant aspects. The Congenital Heart Defects are presented with each chapter devoted to a single malformation, with.

Congenital Heart Defects: Decision Making for Surgery, Vol. 2 1st Edition by Antonio F. Corno (Author), P.J. Del Nido (Foreword) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book.

About 1 in every 4 babies born with a heart defect has a critical congenital heart defect (critical CHD, also known as critical congenital heart disease). 1 Babies with a critical CHD need surgery or other procedures in the first year of life.

Learn more about critical CHDs below. An empirically based tool for analyzing mortality associated with congenital heart surgery Sean M. O’Brien, PhD,a David R. Clarke, congenital heart disease is considerably smaller than that mix when analyzing outcomes and comparing institutions.

MATERIALS AND METHODS. (It) will undoubtedly be a resource of great utility to primary care providers, nurses and advanced practitioners, personnel in cardiac diagnostic and imaging laboratories, and students and physicians in training a first-line resource that takes much of the mystery out of Adult Congenital Heart Disease.".

[email protected] AJN January Vol. No. 1 Online-only content for “Long-Term Outcomes After Repair of Congenital Heart Defects: Part 1” by Marion E.

McRae in the American Journal of Nursing, Januaryp. The Amplatzer Muscular VSD Occluder. Congenital Heart Disease INTRODUCTION: Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects ~1% of newborn infants and accounts for ~10% of all congenital anomalies. Factors that ↑ risk for CHD include maternal diabetes mellitus, familial presence of genetic syndromes (e.g., Noonan.

Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Find out what makes them more : James Roland.Congenital heart defects are present at birth and are conditions which affect the way a baby's heart is formed. The causes of most congenital heart defects are not well understood.

Research suggests that there may be certain prevention activities that a mother (and father) can do to help increase the chance of having a baby with a healthy heart.INTRODUCTION.

Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common defect among all birth defects representing a major global health problem. Twenty-eight percent of all major congenital anomalies consist of heart defects.[] The worldwide prevalence of CHD is estimated to be eight to ten per live births[] but the prevalence greatly varies between regions.